FB17-039: Enhancements to the Login Procedure for the Catch Shares Online System

Fish

KEY MESSAGE:

  • NOAA Fisheries has simplified the login procedure for the catch share online system.
  • The catch share online system is home to the Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) programs for commercial Red Snapper and Grouper-Tilefish as well as the Bluefin Tuna Individual Bycatch Quota (BFT) program.
  • Users no longer have to specify their role before logging in.
  • Users also no longer have to click to “Accept Terms of Use.”  Simply clicking on the login button indicates acceptance of the Terms of Use of the web application.
  • Users of both programs (IFQ and BFT) can access the catch share online system at https://portal.southeast.fisheries.noaa.gov/cs/.

 

HOW TO LOG INTO THE ONLINE CATCH SHARES SYSTEM:

  • After clicking on the “Log In” button in the upper right corner of the SERO Catch Shares homepage the Login Form pop-up box will appear.
  • To log in to the SERO Catch Share system:
    1. Enter your User ID.  User IDs are usually 4 letters followed by 4 numbers and are NOT case sensitive.
    2. Enter your PIN.  PINs are case sensitive (upper and lower case must be exact).
    3. Your role will automatically populate after you enter your User ID (IFQ or BFT Shareholder, IFQ or BFT Dealer, or IFQ or BFT Vessel).
    4. Click the login button to access your account.  You are required to change your PIN when you log in for the first time or 180 days after your password was last changed.

 

Shrimp Task Force to Meet August 2 at 10:00 a.m.

Shrimp boat

Credit: Julie Lively

Wednesday, August 2, 2017, 10:00 a.m.

Terrebonne Council Meeting Room

8026 Main Street, Houma, LA 70360

 

The following is the agenda for the Louisiana Shrimp Task Force Meeting. The public is invited to attend.

 

AGENDA

  1.             Roll call and Introduction of Guests
  2.            Approval of the April 12, 2017 Meeting Minutes and the August 2, 2017 Agenda

III.           Treasury Report

  1. Budget Report- LDWF
  2. Old Business
  3. Discussion of the White Shrimp “100 Count Law”- Jeff Marx
  4. New Business
  5. Update on the 2017 Fall Inshore Shrimp Season- Jeff Marx
  6. Discussion of Tow Time Enforcement- Acy Cooper
  7. Discussion of White Spot Disease- Acy Cooper
  8. Update on LA Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board Shrimp Industry Initiative Summary of Efforts- LSPMB Staff
  9.          Public Comment

VII.         Set Quarterly Meetings

VIII.        Adjourn

 

The meeting will be held in compliance with Louisiana’s Open Meetings Law as defined by Louisiana R.S. 42:11, et seq.  The public is invited to attend.  To listen in to the meeting via webinar register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8977246743102042370

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive  email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is committed to accommodating all

reasonable special requests regarding access to our meetings. Please direct all sign

language interpreting services or other accommodation needs to the contact at the top of

this announcement at least 72 hours prior to the meeting date.

It’s official, red snapper anglers get another weekend!

There’s more good news for red snapper fishermen in the state.

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries estimates show that the season will be open through this weekend. So far, state anglers have not threatened the harvest limit that would trigger the closure of the red snapper season, according to LDWF.

 

The latest catch numbers recorded by LDWF’s LA Creel program, the states near real-time data collecting program, is about 655,603 pounds. Last week’s reported catch total was 539,154 pounds. The state’s self-imposed cutoff is 1.04 million pounds for 2017. The most recent estimates cover the period through July 9.

 

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has ordered LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet to close the red snapper season when it appears Louisiana’s catch will meet the 1.04-million-pound limit. It is the goal of LDWF to be accountable for the state’s catch in order to improve its chances of receiving federal government permission allowing Louisiana to oversee its own red snapper season out 200 miles from its coast.

 

The red snapper fishing season was extended 39 days as part of an agreement reached earlier this summer involving Louisiana, the four other Gulf states – Mississippi, Alabama, Texas and Florida – and the U.S. Department of Commerce. It allowed recreational anglers to fish out 200 miles from the Louisiana coast for red snapper for 39 days. Those dates include June 16-18, June 23-25, June 30-July 4, July 7-9, July 14-16, July 21-23, July 28-30, August 4-6, August 11-13, August 18-20, August 25-27, and September 1-4.

Any dates after this weekend will be canceled immediately if the pound limit is reached before September 4.

 

Also under the agreement, there would be no red snapper fishing in state waters – out nine miles from the Louisiana coast – on Mondays through Thursdays, except on July 3-4 and September 4. Anglers are limited to two fish, measuring at least 16 inches per day.

 

For more information on the 2017 red snapper landings estimates, go to: http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/page/41176-red-snapper-long-range-plan-facts/redsnapperwebsitedocument7-19-17-1.pdf

Red Snapper season to remain open this weekend, maybe longer

Red Snapper

Louisiana anglers can breathe a sigh of relief for now. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will not close the red snapper season as some had feared. In fact, there is a chance that the season will last until Sept. 4, the official closure date.

 

According to estimates from LDWF’s LA Creel, the states near real-time data program, if anglers continue to catch red snapper at the current rate, the season may last through Labor Day.

 

“The current harvest rates are certainly lower than we were expecting, so we are able to keep the season open at this time,” said Assistant Secretary for Fisheries Patrick Banks. However, he said, it is very unlikely the current average weekly catch of 66,000 will hold.

 

Louisiana has a self-imposed limit of approximately 15 percent of the total Gulf of Mexico catch. The self-imposed limit equals about 1.04 million pounds of red snapper for 2017.

 

According to the latest LA Creel estimated harvest rate Louisiana anglers would only catch 902,616 pounds of red snapper by Sept. 4. 

 

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has ordered LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet to close the red snapper season when it appears Louisiana’s catch will exceed the 1.04-million-pound limit. It is the goal of LDWF to manage the state’s catch responsibly in order to improve its chances of the federal government allowing Louisiana to oversee its own red snapper season out 200 miles from its coast.

 

Louisiana is part of an agreement reached earlier this summer with four other Gulf states and the U.S. Department of Commerce that allows recreational anglers to fish out 200 miles from the Louisiana coast for red snapper for 39 days. The altered season opened June 16-18 continued on June 23-25, June 30-July 4, July 7-9 and will continue July 14-16, July 21-23, July 28-30, Aug. 4-6, Aug. 11-13, Aug 18-20, Aug. 25-27, and Sept. 1-4.

 

Under the agreement that includes Louisiana, Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida, there would be no red snapper fishing in state waters – out nine miles from the Louisiana coast – on Mondays through Thursdays, except on July 3-4 and Sept. 4. Anglers are limited to two fish, measuring at least 16 inches per day.

 

*For more information on the 2017 red snapper landings estimates go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/page/41176-red-snapper-long-range-plan-facts/redsnapperharvestupdateforwebsite-071317.pdf  .

Louisiana Shrimp Season to Close In Remaining Inside Waters on July 24

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced the 2017 spring inshore shrimp season will close on Monday, July 24 at 6 p.m. in Lake Pontchartrain, Chef Menteur and Rigolets passes, Lake Borgne, and the Louisiana portion of Mississippi Sound. With this action, all state inside waters will be closed with the exception of Breton and Chandeleur sounds.

 

For a map detailing these closures please click here.

 

All state outside waters seaward of the Inside/Outside Shrimp Line, as described in R.S. 56:495 will remain open to shrimping until further notice. 

 

Data collected in recent weeks by LDWF biologists indicate increased quantity, distribution and percentage of small, juvenile white shrimp within these waters. The closure will protect these developing shrimp and provide opportunity for growth to larger and more marketable sizes.

 

LDWF would also like to remind shrimpers there is a possession count on saltwater white shrimp of 100 count (whole shrimp per pound) taken in either inside or outside (offshore) waters of Louisiana. This size restriction applies to the taking or possession of such shrimp aboard a vessel, EXCEPT from Oct. 15 through the third Monday in December, when there is no possession count on saltwater white shrimp. When more than 50 percent by weight of the saltwater shrimp taken or possessed is seabobs or brown shrimp, then the maximum allowable amount of undersized white shrimp taken or possessed should not exceed 10 percent by weight of the total saltwater shrimp taken or possessed. If compliance issues develop, remaining open areas can be closed by the Secretary of the Department.

For more information, contact Jeff Marx at (337) 373-0032 or jmarx@wlf.la.gov.

Louisiana Shrimp Season to Close July 14 in the Majority of Inside Waters

 

2017_shrimpseason_spring_170706

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced the 2017 spring inshore shrimp season will close at 6 p.m. on Friday, July 14 from the Louisiana/Mississippi state line westward to the eastern shore of the Mississippi River and from Freshwater Bayou canal westward to the Louisiana/Texas state line except for the following waters: Lake Pontchartrain, Chef Menteur and Rigolets Passes, Lake Borgne, the Louisiana portion of Mississippi Sound, and the open waters of Breton and Chandeleur Sounds.

 

For a map detailing these closures please see above or visit

http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/fishing/shrimp-seasons.

All state outside waters seaward of the Inside/Outside Shrimp Line, as described in R.S. 56:495 will remain open to shrimping until further notice. 

 

Data collected in recent weeks by LDWF biologists indicate increased quantity, distribution and percentage of small, juvenile white shrimp within these waters. The decision to close these waters was made to protect these developing shrimp and provide opportunity for growth to larger and more marketable sizes. The areas that remain open will continue to be monitored and will close when the presence of smaller white shrimp make it biologically inappropriate to remain open.  

 

LDWF would also like to remind shrimpers there is a possession count on saltwater white shrimp taken in either inside or outside (offshore) waters of Louisiana of 100 count (whole shrimp per pound). This size restriction applies to the taking or possession of such shrimp aboard a vessel, EXCEPT from Oct. 15 through the third Monday in December, when there is no possession count on saltwater white shrimp taken or possessed. When more than 50 percent by weight of the saltwater shrimp taken or possessed is seabobs or brown shrimp, then the maximum allowable amount of undersized white shrimp taken or possessed should not exceed 10 percent by weight of the total saltwater shrimp taken or possessed.  If compliance issues develop, remaining open areas can be closed by the Secretary of the Department.

For more information, contact Jeff Marx at (337) 373-0032 or jmarx@wlf.la.gov.

August Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Meeting

Sunset Scene

Credit: J. Lively

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission will be meeting in Grand Isle, LA for the meeting on August 3, 2017.  An agenda will be published prior to the meeting date.

 

What:  Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Meeting

 

When:  Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 1:30 P.M.

 

Where: 195 Ludwig Annex, Grand Isle, LA 70358

21 Diamondback Terrapin Hatchlings Released On Louisiana Coastal Barrier Island

DBT

Diamondback Terrapin Hatchling. Photo by Louisiana Sea Grant

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) joined citizen volunteers in releasing 21 diamondback terrapin hatchlings back into the wild Thursday (July 6).

 

The hatchlings, whose eggs were discovered by scientists at a Deepwater Horizon restoration site last year, were released on Chenier Ronquille, a coastal barrier island northeast of Grand Isle. The island’s restoration was funded by Early Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) dollars (Phase III) that went to NOAA for their Outer Coast Restoration Project to restore beach, dune and back-barrier marsh habitats, as well as brown pelicans, terns, skimmers and gulls to help compensate the public for spill-related injuries and losses to these resources.

 

“Partnerships and cooperation between public agencies are crucial to successfully managing wildlife,’’ LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet said. “Having private citizens assist us is a prime example of how that cooperation can be extremely effective. Diamondback terrapins are one of our species of greatest conservation need. So having a chance to return some to their natural environment aids in making sure the population remains stable.’’

 

“CPRA’s coastal work oftentimes goes beyond the obvious building, preserving and restoring land and habitat,” said CPRA Chairman Johnny Bradberry. “In many cases, our attention is called to the preservation of species that once called a location home, along the coast. It’s good to see that these terrapins are now back where they belong.”

 

The story began in July of 2016 when Keri Landry, an endangered species biologist with LDWF’s Louisiana Natural Heritage Program, was contacted by NOAA about diamondback terrapin eggs found on the Chenier Ronquille Barrier Island Restoration Project.

 

Chenier Ronquille is a barrier island located at the entrance to the Barataria Basin in Louisiana that is being restored through Deepwater Horizon early restoration efforts. The restoration is a component of the Louisiana Outer Coast Restoration Project, which restores beach, dune and back-barrier marsh at four barrier island locations. Other project components are being implemented by the CPRA and the U.S. Department of the Interior.

 

“Louisiana’s barrier islands and headlands are the first line of defense during storms, reducing the effects of wind, waves and flooding on coastal marshes,” said Pat Montanio, Director of NOAA Fisheries’ Office of Habitat Conservation. “They also provide habitat for fish, shrimp, birds and other wildlife, but have been impacted by storms and oil spills like Deepwater Horizon. We’re happy to support this important effort, restoring habitat that helps protect coastal communities in Louisiana.”

 

Landry traveled to the barrier island to collect the diamondback terrapin eggs. Unable to incubate the eggs or raise the hatchlings, she contacted David and Karen Milliken, who assist  LDWF with its work with gopher tortoises, a federal and state-protected species. The Millikens incubated the eggs during July 2016. 

 

The eggs were then turned to Steven and Rachael Creech in August 2016. They hatched in August 2016. The Creechs raised them since that time. Under their constant care, the terrapins have nearly tripled in size since hatching and are now ready to be released into Louisiana’s coastal barrier island system.

 

“LDWF didn’t have the ability to incubate and raise the terrapin eggs,’’ Landry said. “The Millikens and the Creechs have worked with LDWF in the past and came alongside again to help out. They were instrumental in caring for these hatchlings with their willingness to assist LDWF. LDWF’s partnerships with other agencies, like NOAA and CPRA, and with the Millikens and Creechs, make conservation of our most imperiled species a reality.”

 

To view photos and video from Thursday’s release, click here.

FB17-036 Gulf Shrimp Fishery to Re-Open Off Texas on July 15, 2017

Shrimp

Credit: Paula Ouder

WHAT/WHEN:

NOAA Fisheries announces federal waters from 9 to 200 nautical miles off Texas will open to shrimp trawling at 30 minutes after official sunset, local time, on

July 15, 2017, corresponding to the time Texas opens its waters to shrimp trawling.

 

WHY THIS IS HAPPENING:

  • The waters off Texas are closed to shrimp fishing annually to allow brown shrimp to reach a larger and more valuable size prior to harvest, and to prevent waste of brown shrimp that might otherwise be discarded because of their small size.
  • The fishery closed May 15, 2017.
  • The re-opening date for Texas waters is based on the results of biological sampling by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
  • In addition, Texas regulations only allow a 60-day closure; the 60 day period expires July 15.